The Great Depression facts that you did not realized

…s or working part time. The gross national product fell by almost 50%. It was not until 1941, when WWII was underway, that unemployment officially fell back below 10%. Scholars estimate that nearly 50% of children during the Great Depression did not have adequate food, shelter, or medical care. Many suffered rickets. The board game Monopoly, which first became available in 1935, became immensely popular perhaps because players could become…

The Great Depression routine of an ordinary man (Memories of Andy Hansen)

…nd continued to do so during the Depression. We frequently ate fried liver, tongue and heart. My mother also baked her own potato bread. Some of the time my father traded carpenter work with a store keeper for groceries. The Great Depression played out differently for the farmers on Friday Harbor. Out on my grandparents’ farm, located off Farms Road, daily routine continued as usual. Their work was cyclical in nature and determined by the sun…

The most bizarre deaths of Victorian age

…n’s Kensal Green Cemetery, and was midway through a funeral when he caught his foot on a stone and stumbled. As he fell to the ground, the other bearers let go of the coffin, which fell on poor, prone Henry. “The greatest confusion was created amongst the mourners who witnessed the accident,” said the Illustrated Police News in November 1872, “and the widow of the person about to be buried nearly went into…

Top knowledge centers of the world that were tragically destroyed

…from the blood of those killed, and black from all the books that were thrown into the river. Hundreds of thousands of priceless wonders were destroyed, and the sack of the city marked the end of the golden age of Islam. The Great Library of Timbuktu In April, 2012, Timbuktu, once the great spiritual capital of Africa, was assaulted by two rival Tuareg rebel groups. A couple of months later, insurgents from Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb came…

“White Death” killed 705 Soviet Troops within 100 days!

Simo Häyhä, a Finnish sniper, killed 505 Soviet troops. He also killed at least 200 troops with a Suomi 9mm sub-machine gun. The Soviets tried to get rid of Häyhä. On March, 1940, Häyhä was shot in his lower left jaw by a Russian soldier. The bullet had an explosive charge which blew off his lower left cheek. He was picked up by fellow soldiers who said “half his cheek was missing”, but he was not dead. Shortly after the war, Häyhä…

Niccolo Paganini was great violin virtuoso that many thought he was the Son of the Devil

…of the bow, and at another performance he actually took possession of Paganini’s body. In spite of his appearance and the suspicions, however, he was worshiped wherever he went. There was another rumor that he was the greatest womanizer of all time and that he killed a woman, imprisoned her soul in his violin, and used parts of her intestines as an eternal source of gut for his strings. The unearthly screams of women were sometimes heard…