Relatives of the Aztec ruler received payments from the Mexican Government until 1938

fall-of-the-aztecsThe Aztecs and other indigenous people of Mexico followed a system of hereditary aristocracy, which means that the title of chief or ruler was passed down from a father to his son at the time of the father’s death.

This system was still in place and practiced by the time the Spaniards arrived in Mexico. The Spaniards not only respected this tradition, but also added to it. This resulted in many unions between Spanish and Aztec nobility.

The heirs of the Aztec ruler Moctezuma II were included in the descendants of the pre-Columbian elite who received these distinctions. Moctezuma II was the ninth tlatoani or ruler of Tenochtitlan, reigning from 1502 to 1520. Under his rule, the Aztec Empire reached its maximal size.

The family of Moctezuma became known as Condes de Moctezuma, and the holders of this title still reside in Spain. They became part of the Spanish peerage in 1766 when they received a Grandeza, making them Spanish nobility.

A branch of the family on the female side still received an annual amount of about 500 Ducats from the Mexican government as part of a contract signed in the 16th century—all the way up until 1938! The contract also granted Mexico City access to water and lumber on the Moctezumas’ property.

The Aztecs and other indigenous people of Mexico followed a system of hereditary aristocracy, which means that the title of chief or ruler was passed down from a father to his son at the time of the father’s death.

This system was still in place and practiced by the time the Spaniards arrived in Mexico. The Spaniards not only respected this tradition, but also added to it. This resulted in many unions between Spanish and Aztec nobility.

The heirs of the Aztec ruler Moctezuma II were included in the descendants of the pre-Columbian elite who received these distinctions. Moctezuma II was the ninth tlatoani or ruler of Tenochtitlan, reigning from 1502 to 1520. Under his rule, the Aztec Empire reached its maximal size.

The family of Moctezuma became known as Condes de Moctezuma, and the holders of this title still reside in Spain. They became part of the Spanish peerage in 1766 when they received a Grandeza, making them Spanish nobility.

A branch of the family on the female side still received an annual amount of about 500 Ducats from the Mexican government as part of a contract signed in the 16th century—all the way up until 1938! The contract also granted Mexico City access to water and lumber on the Moctezumas’ property.
Read more at http://www.omg-facts.com/category/6/History/11#Lpp6SBWga374Scbv.99

The Tsar Bomba, the largest nuke bomb

tsar bom explosionTsar Bomba the most powerful nuclear weapon ever detonated. Its October 30, 1961 test remains the most powerful artificial explosion in human history. It was also referred to as Kuz’kina Mat’ referring to Nikita Khrushchev’s promise to show the United States a “Kuz’kina Mat'” at the 1960 United Nations General Assembly. The famous Russian idiom, which has been problematic for translators, literally meaning “to show somebody Kuzka’s mother”, equates roughly with the English “We’ll show you!” Developed by the Soviet Union, the bomb had the yield of 50 to 58 megatons of TNT (210 to 240 PJ). Only one bomb of this type was ever officially built and it was tested on October 30, 1961, in the Novaya Zemlya archipelago, at Sukhoy Nos.

The remaining bomb casings are located at the Russian Atomic Weapon Museum.

Wooden houses within hundreds of miles of the explosion were destroyed and radio communication in the area was down for an hour.

Tsar_Bomba_Revised

Alaskan ghost ship for 40 years

ourang-medanThe Baychimo was launched in 1914 in Gothenburg, Sweden, for the Hamburg. After World War I, she was transferred to The Great Britain as part of Germany’s reparations for shipping losses and was acquired by the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1921. Renamed Baychimo and based in Scotland she completed nine successful voyages along the north coast of Canada, visiting trading posts and collecting pelts. On October 1, 1931, at the end of a trading run and loaded with a cargo of fur, the Baychimo became trapped in pack ice. The crew briefly abandoned the ship, traveling over a half-mile of ice to the town of Barrow to take shelter for two days, but the ship had broken free of the ice by the time the crew returned. The ship became mired again on October 8, more thoroughly this time, and on October 15 the Hudson’s Bay Company sent aircraft to retrieve 22 of the crew; 15 men remained behind. Intending to wait out the winter if necessary, they constructed a wooden shelter some distance away. On November 24 a powerful blizzard struck, and after it abated there was no sign of the Baychimo. Her captain decided she must have broken up during the storm and been sunk. A few days later, however, an Inuit seal hunter told him that he had seen the Baychimo about 72 km away from their position. The crewmen tracked the ship down, but deciding she was unlikely to survive the winter, they removed the most valuable furs from the hold to transport by air. The Baychimo was abandoned.

Surprisingly, the Baychimo did not sink, and over the next few decades she was sighted numerous times. People managed to board her several times, but each time they were either unequipped to salvage her or were driven away by bad weather. The last recorded sighting was by a group of Inuit in 1969, 38 years after she was abandoned. She was stuck fast in the pack ice of the Beaufort Sea between Point Barrow and Icy Cape, in the the northwestern Alaskan coast. The Baychimo’s ultimate fate is unknown and she is now presumed sunk.